CAPPS - Avocacy and Communication Professional Development

California Association of Private Postsecondary Schools

U.S. Department of Education Releases Highly Biased, Flawed and Arbitrary Regulation for Public Comment

03/25/2014

APSCU. March 14, 2014.

BAD PUBLIC POLICY WILL DISPLACE MILLIONS OF STUDENTS OVER THE NEXT DECADE; INHIBIT EMPLOYER NEEDS FOR JOB-READY WORKFORCE

Following the public release of the gainful employment regulation NPRM, Steve Gunderson, president and CEO of the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities, released the following statement:
 
“The U.S. Department of Education’s actions confirm that they engaged in a sham negotiated rulemaking process with the sole goal of reaching a predetermined conclusion that will result in eliminating higher education access and opportunity for millions of students based on the type of institution they attend.
 
“The Department has never been interested in constructive input or ensuring that student access is protected. As a result, millions of new traditional students will lose access to postsecondary education and hundreds of thousands of dollars in lifetime earning potential.
 
“Stakeholders have repeatedly expressed concerns that this regulation would restrict access to postsecondary education for an increasingly diverse group of students, many of whom would not be able to attain education at another institution, either because of capacity, location, scheduling or financial aid.
 
“If the regulation were applied to all of higher education, programs like a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University, a law degree from George Washington University Law School and a bachelor’s degree in social work from Virginia Commonwealth University, would all be penalized. The logic behind singling out our students and institutions despite this fact is discriminatory, punitive, and will lead to a higher education system that fails countless students.
 
“The Department should carefully listen to the input and concerns of those impacted by the regulation, something that has been missing from the rulemaking process to date, and either reverse course or modify the regulation to limit the impact on students.”